The CAP•impact Podcast

On today’s episode of The CAP·impact Podcast we talk with McGeorge School of Law Capital Lawyering professor Chris Micheli about some of the institutional challenges to lawmaking in California. We then have a deep dive conversation with Assembly Member Chad Mayes about how our current state of hyper-partisan politics is affecting governing and lawmaking in California.

To learn more about Asm. Mayes’ new organization, New Way California, you can check out their website here.

As always, if you enjoyed today’s episode, please take the time to leave us a five-star rating on iTunes or Apple Podcasts and subscribe to our show wherever you listen to podcasts. All of that helps other people find the show.

You can stay in touch with us and let us know what you think about the show on Facebook and Twitter. Just like CAP impact on Facebook or follow @CAPimpactCA on Twitter. Or you hit me up directly on Twitter @jon_wainwright.

And last but not least, you can learn more about the Capital Center for Law and Policy at McGeorge School of Law here.

Thanks for listening to today’s show.

As promised, today’s episode of The CAP·impact Podcast is Part 2 of the panel discussion on Journalism in the Era of Fake News. You can find Part 1 here.

As always, if you enjoyed today’s episode, please take the time to leave us a five-star rating on iTunes or Apple Podcasts and subscribe to our show wherever you listen to podcasts. All of that helps other people find the show.

You can stay in touch with us and let us know what you think about the show on Facebook and Twitter. Just like CAP impact on Facebook or follow @CAPimpactCA on Twitter. Or you hit me up directly on Twitter @jon_wainwright.

And last but not least, you can learn more about the Capital Center for Law and Policy at McGeorge School of Law here.

Thanks for listening to today’s show.

 

This week’s LIVE episode of The CAP·impact Podcast was recorded a little while back at the Sterling Hotel here in Sacramento. Every year, the Capital Center for Law & Policy hosts the Mike Belote Endowed Capital Lecture. This year’s topic, and today’s episode, was Journalism in the Era of Fake News.

The discussion between the three esteemed journalists on the panel runs longer than our normal shows so we’ve split it in two episodes. Part 1 is the moderated portion of the panel discussion. Next week’s episode is Part 2, where we’ll feature the audience questions.

As always, if you enjoyed today’s episode, please take the time to leave us a five-star rating on iTunes or Apple Podcasts and subscribe to our show wherever you listen to podcasts. All of that helps other people find the show.

You can stay in touch with us and let us know what you think about the show on Facebook and Twitter. Just like CAP impact on Facebook or follow @CAPimpactCA on Twitter. Or you hit me up directly on Twitter @jon_wainwright.

And last but not least, you can learn more about the Capital Center for Law and Policy at McGeorge School of Law here.

Thanks for listening to today’s show.

This week’s episode of The CAP·impact Podcast features a case study in one of Ray LeBov’s Rules for Effective Lobbying: not letting the perfect become the enemy of the good. Today we are talking with folks from two organizations that regular readers and podcast listeners will be familiar with – the California Partnership to End Domestic Violence and the California Coalition Against Sexual Assault. Specifically, we talk with the Partnership’s Jacquie Marroquin and CALCASA’s John Finley about their organizations’ joint effort to secure a $50 million allocation in the General Fund of California’s state budget for sexual assault and domestic violence prevention programs. It’s an effort that we talked with John Finley about previously.

Since the California Legislature passed the state budget last week, what better time than now to check in with Jacquie and John about how the effort panned out. You can likely figure out, in rough terms, what the outcome was, just based on the title of today’s show alone. But don’t tune out because while the title gives away the overall outcome, it doesn’t spoil any of the details.

Today’s show also features an explanation of the lobbying process for California’s state budget from McGeorge Capital Lawyering adjunct professor Chris Micheli.

As always, if you enjoyed today’s episode, please take the time to leave us a five-star rating on iTunes or Apple Podcasts and subscribe to our show wherever you listen to podcasts. All of that helps other people find the show.

You can stay in touch with us and let us know what you think about the show on Facebook and Twitter. Just like CAP impact on Facebook or follow @CAPimpactCA on Twitter. Or you hit me up directly on Twitter @jon_wainwright.

And last but not least, you can learn more about the Capital Center for Law and Policy at McGeorge School of Law here.

Thanks for listening to today’s show.

On today’s episode of The CAP⋅impact Podcast we are diving in to California’s primary election. If you listen to news and politics podcasts, it’s very likely that you’ve already heard about California’s Top Two primary system – likely within the context of how the system could have led to Democratic candidates being  shut out of congressional races across southern California and California’s Central Valley or how it could shut out Republicans from the race for Governor.

Ultimately, neither of those scenarios came to fruition. Democrats got their candidates through in the Congressional contests and Republican businessman John Cox advanced to the general election to face off against Democrat and Lieutenant Governor Gavin Newsom.

That’s enough horse race coverage for this post. If you want a recap of the primary, you can check out last week’s post from Jon Wainwright on the implications of the primary results.

This week’s podcast focuses more on the Top Two primary itself – the structure of it and how it came to be in California – and how the Top Two Primary affects how campaigns talk to voters. For the explainer on Top Two primary, we’re talking with McGeorge professor and elections expert Mary-Beth Moylan, and to discuss how the Top Two primary has changed campaigns, we brought in Democratic consultant Brian Brokaw – no relation to Tom Brokaw.

We hope you enjoy today’s episode. As always, we would greatly appreciate it if you can leave us a five star rating on iTunes or Apple Podcasts. Another great way to help us to subscribe to the show wherever you listen to podcasts.

And lastly, you can always let us know what you think about today’s episode in the comments, or on Facebook and Twitter.

On this week’s episode of The CAP⋅impact Podcast, we revisit our conversation with Assembly Member JAmes Gallagher (R – Yuba City) on the Oroville Dam crisis, the series of events that led up to it, it’s impacts, and what is being done now that the crisis is over.

You might be wondering why we’re going back to this conversation, it’s because Assembly Member Gallagher put out a statement along with his counterpart in the California State Senate, Senator Jim Nielsen, in response to Governor Jerry Brown’s May revision to the state budget. Their statement reads:

We thank the Governor for heeding our and our constituents’ call to fund the repairs of the damaged levees. The increased funding of $125 million for levee repair and maintenance is welcome news to our communities. Last year alone, high water events resulted in significant damage to the levees that protect our homes and communities with an estimated $800 million in needed repairs. Maintaining and repairing these levees will require an ongoing funding commitment. While more is needed, we are pleased to see the Governor’s revised budget includes funding for this purpose.”

Given how hyper-partisan political discourse has become, the statement stood out to me because we see two Republican members of the California Legislature offering praise for a Democratic governor. But it’s also not hard to make the connection between the crisis with the Oroville Dam and “high water events” last year.

Since this is a policy podcast, obviously we talked about some legislation. One of the bill’s referenced was still pending a vote in the Senate when we recorded. That bill, AB 1270, is one of thirteen new laws already enacted by the California Legislature and Governor Brown. The other bill, AB 3045, which was recently written about in Capitol Weekly by Tess Townsend, would move oversight of the State Water Project from the Department of Water Resources – which we regularly refer to as DWR in the podcast – to “a new State Water Project Commission under the state’s Natural Resources Agency” to run the State Water Project, of which the Oroville Dam is the centerpiece.

As always, thank you for listening to this week’s podcast. If you enjoyed the show, please subscribe to it on iTunes, Apple Podcasts, or whichever podcast client you prefer. And while you’re there, please leave us a 5-star rating and a review.

 

On today’s episode of The CAP⋅impact Podcast we’ll be exploring a bill that’s been mentioned in a few previous episodes and still working it’s way through the California Legislature, AB 931. The bill would change the use of force standard in California from reasonable to necessary. To help explain the bill itself and what that change would mean in practical terms, we talked to the bill’s author, Assembly Member Shirley Weber.

This is the conclusion of a trio of podcasts we’ve done in response to the shooting of Stephon Clark here in Sacramento. Those episodes were “Protests and the Push for Independent Investigations” with Assembly Member Kevin McCarty talking about his push in the California Legislature for indpendent investigations of instances of use of deadly force, and “Moving The Needle on Police On Black Violence” which featured four lawyers who are members of the Wiley Manuel Bar Association talking about how the shooting of Stephon Clark has affected them and their thoughts on what the community can do going forward to heal the wounds and find solutions.

On legislation like AB 931, that is, legislation that would make a noticeable impact on how folks go about doing their job on a day to day basis, it’s to be expected that the affected groups – both directly affected and indirectly affected – are going to try to influence the shape and outcome of that legislation. That is certainly the case here with AB 931 with the law enforcement community and community groups both showing up to have their voices heard. And to explain how groups influence legislation, and which pressure points they consider to influence legislation, we talk to veteran lobbyist and adjunct professor in McGeorge School of Law’s Capital Lawyering program, Chris Micheli.

As always, if you like the show, please click “SUBSCRIBE” on iTunes or Apple Podcasts, and while you’re there, please leave the show a 5 star rating. You can also let us know what you think of the show on Facebook or Twitter. And feel free to like and/or follow us while you’re there as well.

In today’s episode of The CAP⋅impact Podcast we are talking about California’s foster care system and. In particular, we’ll be talking about AB 1784 – authored by Assembly Member Brian Maienschein (R – San Diego) which is one bill working its way through the California Legislature aimed at improving the system. To get more information on what’s in the bill and what it will do, we’ve brought Carli Olson on to this week’s episode. Carli is a Legislative Aide in Asm. Maienschein’s office and she is the staffer who is taking the lead on AB 1784.

The other people you’ll hear in today’s episode will sound familiar if you’ve been following our series The Clinic. That’s because we’re talking to Keri Firth and Michelle Evans, both of whom are McGeorge students who are participating in the school’s Legislative and Public Policy Clinic. We explore in much more depth what that clinic is in The Clinic, but to give you a quick summary of it, the Legislative and Public Policy Clinic gives McGeorge students the opportunity to experience the legislative process first-hand. Students come up with an idea for a bill and from there, they lobby that bill from start to finish through the California Legislature.

This is an exciting episode because it gives us a chance to highlight the great work Keri and Michelle are doing for a new audience.

As I promised in the episode, there are two places you can find the entirety of this series we’re doing with Keri and Michelle and they navigate AB 1784 through the California Legislature. Again, those spots are our page for The Clinic here on CAP⋅impact. The other place you can find all the episodes of The Clinic on our Soundcloud page.

As always, if you enjoy The CAP⋅impact Podcast, there are a couple of free and easy things you can do to help us out. Please subscribe to the show on iTunes or Apple Podcasts, and while you’re there, please leave us a five star rating and a review.

In today’s episode of The CAP⋅impact Podcast we continue to explore the myriad of issues surrounding the shooting of Stephon Clark. To see where we started this series, you can refer back to last week’s episode where we talked with McGeorge alumna and former Deputy District Attorney Alana Mathews; McGeorge alumnus, former Public Defender, and criminal defense attorney Keith Staten, civil rights and criminal defense attorney Justin Ward, and founding member of the American Society of Evidence Based Policing Dr. Obed Magny.

Today’s conversation starts with two people familiar to regular CAP⋅impact readers, Leslie Jacobs – Professor of Law and Director of the Capital Center for Law & Policy at McGeorge School of Law – and Mary-Beth Moylan – Professor of Law and Associate Dean of Experiential Learning at McGeorge School of Law – talking about the issues they know best – free speech and elections, respectively – as they relate to the shooting and death of Stephon Clark.

We also talk with State Assembly Member Kevin McCarty (D-AD 7) who represents Sacramento in the California Legislature. We talk with Asm. McCarty about the impact the shooting and the protests have had in his district. We also discuss the legislation he is working on in response to the shooting as well as his push for independent investigations of instances of use of deadly force.

I hope you enjoy today’s episode. If you did enjoy today’s show, please subscribe to The CAP⋅impact Podcast on iTunes or Apple Podcasts and leave the show a five star review while you’re there. You can also let us know what you think of today’s episode in the comments, or on Facebook and Twitter.

On this week’s episode of The CAP·impact Podcast we talk with four legal experts about the shooting of Stephon Clark and the issues that have risen to the surface since that fateful night. Our experts are: former Deputy District Attorney – and McGeorge alumna – Alana Mathews; criminal defense attorney – and McGeorge alumnus – Keith Staten; civil right and criminal defense attorney Justin Ward; and Dr. Obed Magny, and founding member of the American Society of Evidence Based Policing (ASEBP) and an officer with Sacramento PD in the Professional Standards Unit, Dr. Obed Magny. NOTE: Dr. Magny is only speaking in his capacity as a member of ASEBP.

The impact of Stephon Clark’s death on the community is not to be understated. Sacramento made national news with the response of the police force during and after the shooting. It’s an issue that strikes very close to home for the panelists – both on emotional and geographic levels. We talked through various conflicting views about the videos released by the police, the possible future actions through legislation, and if awareness and activism surrounding police shootings can lead to future change in the relationship between law enforcement officials and the communities that they are sworn to protect.

If you want to learn more about the work that our panelists are currently engaged in, you can visit the following pages for:

I hope you enjoy today’s podcast. As always, you can find the show on iTunes, Apple Podcasts, and Stitcher Radio. If you enjoyed today’s show, please leave us a 5-star review on iTunes and Apple Podcasts while you’re there. Doing so will help other people find The CAP·impact Podcast more easily.