The CAP•impact Podcast

On today’s episode of The The CAP·impact Podcast, we talk with Lexi Howard (JD ’15) and Erinn Ryberg (JD ’13) – two McGeorge alumna – who worked to kill AB 638, a bill that would have outlawed immigration consultants in California.

We go over what immigration consultants do, where they fit in the immigration law ecosystem, the actual problem that AB 638 was trying to fix, and why ultimately the bill needed to be killed.

As always, if you enjoyed today’s episode, please take the time to leave us a five-star rating on iTunes, Apple Podcasts, or Stitcher Radio, and subscribe to our show wherever you listen to podcasts. All of that helps other people find the show.

You can stay in touch with us and let us know what you think about the show on Facebook and Twitter. Just like CAP impact on Facebook or follow @CAPimpactCA on Twitter.

And last but not least, you can learn more about the Capital Center for Law and Policy at McGeorge School of Law here.

On today’s episode of The CAP·impact Podcast, I sit down with McGeorge adjunct professor, and very good friend of the podcast, Chris Micheli, to talk about recent California Supreme Court decision in Dynamex Operations West, Inc. v Superior Court.

For those unfamiliar with the case, it, in essence, drastically changed how independent contractors are classified in California. Chris and I talk about what the old rules were, how the Dynamex decision will effect employers in the traditional economy space – as well as the new gig economy – and what we can reasonably expect to see the Legislature do in the upcoming year to address some of the issues raised by the business community by Dynamex.

As always, if you enjoyed today’s episode, please take the time to leave us a five-star rating on iTunes or Apple Podcasts and subscribe to our show wherever you listen to podcasts. All of that helps other people find the show.

You can stay in touch with us and let us know what you think about the show on Facebook and Twitter. Just like CAP impact on Facebook or follow @CAPimpactCA on Twitter.

And last but not least, you can learn more about the Capital Center for Law and Policy at McGeorge School of Law here.

Now that the California Legislature’s two-year legislative session has come to a close the drama around the bills that have worked their way through the legislative process has switched gears from “Will it pass?” to “Will the governor sign it?”. While we’re not completely through the period of time that the Governor has to sign or veto legislation, I thought it would be fun to take a look at how some of the bills we’ve followed here on CAP·impact – either on the blog or on The CAP·impact Podcast – have fared so far. Below is a list of some of the bills we’ve tracked with what their status is – alive, dead, or waiting for action by the Governor.

Assembly Bills

  • AB 931: Use of force by peace officers – Dead, held in Senate Rules Committee.
  • AB 1436: Suicide prevention training – Enrolled, awaiting final action from the Governor
  • AB 1784: Pilot program for support services for resource families – Dead, held on Suspense file in Senate Appropriations. Will be revived next session.
  • AB 1971: Reform of the Lanterman-Petris-Short Act – Dead, ordered to inactive file by coauthor
  • AB 2018: Loan forgiveness program for public mental health professionals – Dead, held on Suspense File in Senate Appropriations

Senate Bills

  • SB 320: Medication abortion at public universities – Enrolled, awaiting final action from the Governor
  • SB 901: Wildfires – Enrolled, awaiting final action from the Governor
  • SB 906: Mental health service, peer support specialist certification – Enrolled, awaiting final action from the Governor
  • SB 1004: Mental Health Services Act: prevention and early intervention – Enrolled, awaiting final action from the Governor
  • SB 1113: Mental health in the workplace: voluntary standards – Signed into law by Governor Brown
  • SB 1421: Public access to police records – Enrolled, awaiting final action from the Governor

So at this point one of the bills we looked at this year has become law, six have passed both houses of the California Legislature and are waiting to be acted on by Governor Brown, and 4 are dead.

On today’s episode of The CAP⋅impact Podcast we talk with Maggy Krell, Chief Legal Counsel for Planned Parenthood Affiliates of California about the impact of US Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy’s retirement from the highest court in the nation, the potential impact of Judge Brett Kavanaugh’s confirmation to the Supreme Court, the numerous attempted and proposed changes to healthcare policy at the federal level, and what all of that means for Californians.

We also talk with McGeorge Professor Ederlina Co about SB 320 by State Senator Connie Leyva (D – Chino), which recently passed the California Legislature and is awaiting Governor Brown’s signature, and the significance of that bill in light what has been going on in Congress and at the federal level in regards to healthcare.

As always, if you enjoyed today’s episode, please take the time to leave us a five-star rating on iTunes or Apple Podcasts and subscribe to our show wherever you listen to podcasts. All of that helps other people find the show.

You can stay in touch with us and let us know what you think about the show on Facebook and Twitter. Just like CAP impact on Facebook or follow @CAPimpactCA on Twitter.

And last but not least, you can learn more about the Capital Center for Law and Policy at McGeorge School of Law here.

On today’s podcast, McGeorge Capital Lawyering adjunct professor Chris Micheli breaks down the different vote requirements different types of legislation have to clear, and there’s more than just the majority and 2/3 requirements most folks know about. Chris also goes over the different kinds of legislative publications. And to wrap up today’s show, we talk with Kim Barnes – the Chief Legislation Editor for University of the Pacific Law Review’s Greensheets Edition and host of the podcast In Session – to talk about what to expect from the second season of In Session.

If you aren’t subscribing to In Session already, you can find it on Apple Podcasts and you will start seeing new episodes every week starting on Tuesday, September 4. You can also follow University of the Pacific Law Review on Facebook and Twitter.

As always, if you enjoyed today’s episode, please take the time to leave us a five-star rating on iTunes or Apple Podcasts and subscribe to our show wherever you listen to podcasts. All of that helps other people find the show.

You can stay in touch with us and let us know what you think about the show on Facebook and Twitter. Just like CAP impact on Facebook or follow @CAPimpactCA on Twitter.

And last but not least, you can learn more about the Capital Center for Law and Policy at McGeorge School of Law here.

If you’ve ever wondered about why some states have legalized marijuana and some haven’t, or why even though marijuana is legal in it’s still illegal to posses or use it, then today’s episode is for you.

McGeorge Professor of Law Mike Vitiello gives a brief history of the legalization of cannabis in today’s episode. It’s from a previous one of the Capital Center’s Executive Trainings – of which there a couple every year. This piece is the first of a few that we’ll be putting out in the next few weeks.

As always, if you enjoyed today’s episode, please take the time to leave us a five-star rating on iTunes or Apple Podcasts and subscribe to our show wherever you listen to podcasts. All of that helps other people find the show.

You can stay in touch with us and let us know what you think about the show on Facebook and Twitter. Just like CAP impact on Facebook or follow @CAPimpactCA on Twitter.

And last but not least, you can learn more about the Capital Center for Law and Policy at McGeorge School of Law here.

On today’s episode of The CAP·impact Podcast we talk with Erin Evans-Fudem – a Legislative Representative at the League of California Cities, and McGeorge class of 2012 – about the wildfires across California, some of the factors that have led to the surge in wildfires recently, and the issue of liability – specifically as it pertains to shareholder owned utilities like PG&E.

On that liability front, we walk through the legal doctrine called “inverse condemnation” – which is the current standard used in California when it comes to liability – some of the proposals the Legislature is working on to address the issue, and what cities are particularly concerned about on this issue.

As always, if you enjoyed today’s episode, please take the time to leave us a five-star rating on iTunes or Apple Podcasts and subscribe to our show wherever you listen to podcasts. All of that helps other people find the show.

You can stay in touch with us and let us know what you think about the show on Facebook and Twitter. Just like CAP impact on Facebook or follow @CAPimpactCA on Twitter.

And last but not least, you can learn more about the Capital Center for Law and Policy at McGeorge School of Law here.

On today’s show we are giving you the rundown on what the biggest issues facing the California Legislature are in its final month of session. August is going to be a four week sprint to the finish line, so brought on CAP·impact podcast regular – as well as lobbyist, capitol observer, McGeorge alum, and McGeorge adjunct professor – Chris Micheli to help distill which of the roughly 1,400 remaining bills the California Legislature has to work on will be the most interesting.

You can find a similar rundown that Chris wrote on Fox & Hounds, however, he goes into more depth on these bills and a few others on our podcast.

As always, if you enjoyed today’s episode, please take the time to leave us a five-star rating on iTunes or Apple Podcasts and subscribe to our show wherever you listen to podcasts. All of that helps other people find the show.

You can stay in touch with us and let us know what you think about the show on Facebook and Twitter. Just like CAP impact on Facebook or follow @CAPimpactCA on Twitter.

And last but not least, you can learn more about the Capital Center for Law and Policy at McGeorge School of Law here.

In today’s episode, we finish our conversation with Adriana Ruelas and Adrienne Shilton from the Steinberg Institute. You can find the first half of our conversation here. Today we talk about SB 1113 and AB 1971.

They’re both interesting bills. SB 1113 would establish voluntary workplace mental health standards, meaning that the state of California would set standards for what would be in workplace mental standards, but companies could volunteer to adopt those standards.

AB 1971 is where we spend more time, however, and it’s the most controversial of the bills that we talked about. AB 1971 expands the definition of “gravely disabled” to “include a condition in which a person, as a result of a mental health disorder, is unable to provide for his or her basic personal needs for medical treatment, if the failure to receive medical treatments, as defined, results in a deteriorating physical condition that a medical professional, in her or her best medical judgment, attests in writing, will more likely than not, lead to death within 6 months.” In practical terms, this bill would make it easier for medical professionals to place someone under a 5150 hold.

In addition to legislation, we also talk with Lacey Mickleburgh who is a staff attorney at McGeorge School of Law’s Homeless Advocacy Clinic, which is part of McGeorge’s Community Legal Services about the services  that they’re providing and the interdisciplinary approach they take to helping those who are experiencing homelessness or those who are housing insecure here in the Sacramento region.

You can learn more about the individual bills that we talk about in the links above, and you can learn more about Steinberg Institute and the work they do here. And you can learn more about all of McGeorge’s legal clinics here.

As always, if you enjoyed today’s episode, please take the time to leave us a five-star rating on iTunes or Apple Podcasts and subscribe to our show wherever you listen to podcasts. All of that helps other people find the show.

You can stay in touch with us and let us know what you think about the show on Facebook and Twitter. Just like CAP impact on Facebook or follow @CAPimpactCA on Twitter. Or you hit me up directly on Twitter @jon_wainwright.

And last but not least, you can learn more about the Capital Center for Law and Policy at McGeorge School of Law here.

We’re sat down with Adriana Ruelas and Adrienne Shilton on this week’s episode of The CAP·impact Podcast to talk about a number of mental health bills that the Steinberg Institute is working on this year. This week is part one of the conversation, we’ll part two for you next week.

I was initially inspired to seek out having this conversation after the suicides of Kate Spade and Anthony Bourdain. While that was the original impetus for the conversation, we also talked at length about the homelessness crisis in California.

This week, we talk in depth about AB 1436 and SB 1004 as well as briefly touch on AB 2018 and SB 906.

You can learn more about the individual bills that we talk about in the links above, and you can learn more about Steinberg Institute and the work they do here.

As always, if you enjoyed today’s episode, please take the time to leave us a five-star rating on iTunes or Apple Podcasts and subscribe to our show wherever you listen to podcasts. All of that helps other people find the show.

You can stay in touch with us and let us know what you think about the show on Facebook and Twitter. Just like CAP impact on Facebook or follow @CAPimpactCA on Twitter. Or you hit me up directly on Twitter @jon_wainwright.

And last but not least, you can learn more about the Capital Center for Law and Policy at McGeorge School of Law here.

Thanks for listening to today’s show.