McGeorge Adjunct Professor Chris Micheli

Now that the deadline for Governor Newsom to act on the legislation that made it to his desk has passed, we can take a brief overview of how he acted on the bills that made it to the Governor’s desk in his first year in office.

In total, 1,042 bills – out of 2,625

Greensheets staff writer Mike Adams at McGeorge School of Law

By: Mike Adams

Kids these days with their newfangled smartphones! It’s stunting their brains!

It sounds like a clichéd complaint from an older generation, but that grouchy old curmudgeon might actually be right. Modern social science research is starting to uncover some very serious negative effects of excessive screen time. Depression and lowered school achievement

McGeorge Adjunct Professor Chris Micheli

Most of the powers of the executive branch of California’s state government are found in Article V of the California Constitution. Today’s post and podcast is a description, briefly, of those constitutional provisions affecting the Governor and his or her administration. A smaller sample of the Governor’s powers are discussed in the post, while

McGeorge Adjunct Professor Chris Micheli

Most of the provisions pertaining to the California Legislature can be found in Article IV of the California State Constitution, although provisions affecting the legislative branch of government appear in nearly half a dozen other articles of the state constitution. The California Constitution is generally looked at in order to determine whether it prohibits

McGeorge Adjunct Professor Chris Micheli

There are several ways in which the California Legislature can influence the rulemaking activities of these executive branch entities. Primarily the Legislature does this through lawmaking and the budget.

Generally speaking, the authority of California’s agencies and departments to adopt policy through its rulemaking activities is both defined and restricted by state statute. It’s

McGeorge Adjunct Professor Chris Micheli

Under our state constitution’s separation of power provisions, the laws of the state are generally enacted by the legislative branch of government, administered by the executive branch of government, and interpreted by the judicial branch of government. With the executive branch being charged with both administering and enforcing the law, state agencies and departments

McGeorge Adjunct Professor Chris Micheli

There are a number of political institutions in California. California’s constitutional officers, that is those who are provided for by the California Constitution, are among those important political institutions. I’ll provide a brief overview of all of California’s Constitutional Officers, save the Governor, below. Two of the officers

McGeorge Adjunct Professor Chris Micheli

Today I’ll be taking an in-depth look at California’s Constitution, and also do a brief comparison of California’s Constitution to the U.S. Constitution.

California’s Constitution was adopted in 1849, just prior to California becoming a state in 1850. It is the governing document for the state of California. By most accounts, our state’s constitution

McGeorge Adjunct Professor Chris Micheli

Like the federal government, California laws are found in three places: the state constitution, the codes or the statutes, and regulations. The hierarchy of laws in California is the same as under federal law, with the Constitution on top, statutes in the middle, and regulations on the bottom. The following is a brief overview

McGeorge Adjunct Professor Chris Micheli

Lobbying is advocating on behalf of a client or cause – generally for payment but also sometimes on a volunteer basis – to attempt to influence official action of either legislative or executive branch officials, and their staff. Individuals, or groups of individuals, lobby elected and appointed officials and their staff in an attempt